WS 5.1 Setting Anti-Corruption Agenda for MDGs short report

Huguette Labelle, Christian Gruenberg, Phil Matsheza, Magdalena Sepulveda, Mamiki Thabitha Shai, Minar Pimple, Renata Nowak-Garmer, Anga Timilsina, 14th IACC, Workshop report, Development, Human Security, Civil Society

 

Short WORKSHOP REPORT FORM

Number and title of workshop: WS 5.1 Setting Anti-Corruption Agenda for MDGs: Challenges and Opportunities
 
Coordinator: Anga Timilsina, UNDP
 
Date and time of workshop: Setting Anti-Corruption Agenda for MDGs: Challenges and Opportunities
 
Moderator: Huguette Labelle, Transparency International
 
Rapporteur: Renata Nowak-Garmer, UNDP
 
Panellists:
Christian Gruenber, International Council on Human Rights Policy, Researcher
Phil Matsheza, UNDP, Anti-Corruption Advisor
Minar Pimple, UN Millennium Campaign Asia-Pacific, Director
Magadalena Sepulveda, UN Special Rapporteur on Extreme Poverty
Mamiki Thabitha Shai, Public Protector, South Africa
 
Main Issues Covered

The workshop discussed the impact of various forms of corruption on the achievement of MDGs against the backdrop of the recent UN MDG Summit 2010 where countries’ progress on the Goals has been reviewed. Corruption, lack of transparency and accountability has been identified as one of the major obstacles hindering the development by diverting or leakages of resources, mismanagement, illicit financial flows that amount to $1.8 trillion annually and by infringement on human rights. Reducing levels of corruption would contribute to the acceleration of progress toward the MDGs. This has been recognized in the MDG Summit Outcome Document as well as in the UN Secretary General’s report, Keeping the Promise. UNDP current efforts in anti-corruption will therefore focus on assisting the countries
to mainstream their anti-corruption efforts into sectors, such as health, education and water. According to the latest statistics, excluding China and India that are the major contributors to progress on the MDGs, the number of people living in poverty has increased. The UN Special Rapporteur on Extreme Poverty supported the case for the acceleration efforts on the MDGs especially in sub-Saharan Africa. Social protection schemes have been introduced in many countries as a way to address
extreme poverty. However, special attention should be paid to ensuring that social protection schemes include anti-corruption mechanisms as they often provide a fertile ground for corruption especially for those living in extreme poverty. Not being aware of their rights and entitlements, the extreme poor, women and indigenous peoples are particularly vulnerable to corruption, political manipulation and abuse. Conditional social protection schemes (such as conditional cash transfers) are particularly prone to corruption.
Increasing access to information and transparency concerning such programmes has been stressed as one of the ways to address corruption in the area of social protection. The information on government programmes for those living in poverty should be made accessible, available and should be culturally adequate and acceptable. Furthermore, a clear and simple complaint mechanism should be established for reporting on the cases of abuse of such programmes. The modern technologies, especially mobiles could be applied for this purpose.
Civil society has a fundamental role to play in monitoring MDG funding, government budgets and policies and their implementation. The international community as well as governments themselves should work toward engagement and empowerment of women and youth in this context.
 
Main Outcomes

Main Outputs

Recommendations, Follow-up Actions

- Social protection schemes should include anti-corruption mechanisms as they often provide a fertile ground for corruption especially for those living in extreme poverty.
- Increasing access to information and transparency concerning social protection is key in addressing corruption in the area of social protection.
- The information on government programmes for those living in poverty should be made accessible, available and should be culturally adequate and acceptable.
- Civil society has a fundamental role to play in monitoring MDG funding, government budgets and policies and their implementation. International community as well as governments themselves should work toward engagement and empowerment of women and youth in this context.
- Rights-based approach should be incorporated within the MDGs agenda 
 
Workshop Highlights (including interesting quotes)

- Reducing levels of corruption will contribute to the acceleration of progress toward the MDGs.
- The extreme poor, women and indigenous peoples are particularly vulnerable to corruption, political manipulation and abuse. 
- “Protect those who denounce corruption; also on community-level.” 
- “We need a new paradigm that includes specific needs of women.”
- “Civil society should own the MDGs.”
pdfWS 5.1 Setting Anti-Corruption Agenda for MDGs short report

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